Pull Words Off the Page to Promote Learning

News from EDUTOPIA - 4 hours 34 min ago
Two vocabulary exercises that get students to make connections between words and explain their thinking.

Getting Started With Self-Organized Learning Environments

News from EDUTOPIA - 7 hours 36 min ago
Tips for creating a more student-centered and collaborative classroom.

Editors of Brazilian journals – a hard life that is getting harder! [Originally published as the editorial in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências vol. 89 no. 1]

Research Scholarship - 8 hours 41 min ago
The financing of journals of Brazil can be improved by extending the validity period of research grants, in order to allow publishers a better plan for articles publication. An editorial written by Alexander Kellner in the first issue of 2017 of Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências examines the challenge faced by editors of journals of Brazil and highlights their hard work in attracting relevant manuscripts, seeking to achieve ever greater levels of excellence and internationalization. … Read More →...

CORDEIRO, Y., & SCHUCK, P. (2015) Hot Topics in Biomedical Sciences. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 87(2), 1271-1272. DOI: 10.1590/0001-376520158722  Hot Topics in Biomedical Sciences

Kellner, A., & Ponciano, L. (2008) H-index in the Brazilian Academy of Sciences: comments and concerns. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 80(4), 771-781. DOI: 10.1590/S0001-37652008000400016  H-index in the Brazilian Academy of Sciences: comments and concerns

Madeira, R., & Marenco, A. (2016) Os desafios da internacionalização: mapeando dinâmicas e rotas da circulação internacional. Revista Brasileira de Ciência Política, 47-74. DOI: 10.1590/0103-335220161903  Os desafios da internacionalização: mapeando dinâmicas e rotas da circulação internacional

Meneghini, R., Packer, A., & Nassi-Calò, L. (2008) Articles by Latin American Authors in Prestigious Journals Have Fewer Citations. PLoS ONE, 3(11). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0003804  Articles by Latin American Authors in Prestigious Journals Have Fewer Citations

Oliveira Filho, R., Hochman, B., Nahas, F., & Ferreira, L. (2005) Fomento à publicação científica e proteção do conhecimento científico. Acta Cirurgica Brasileira. DOI: 10.1590/S0102-86502005000800009  Fomento à publicação científica e proteção do conhecimento científico

Packer, A. (2011) Os periódicos brasileiros e a comunicação da pesquisa nacional. Revista USP, 26. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9036.v0i89p26-61  Os periódicos brasileiros e a comunicação da pesquisa nacional

Rego, T. (2014) Produtivismo, pesquisa e comunicação científica: entre o veneno e o remédio. Educação e Pesquisa, 40(2), 325-346. DOI: 10.1590/S1517-97022014061843  Produtivismo, pesquisa e comunicação científica: entre o veneno e o remédio

Van Noorden R. (2013) Open access: The true cost of science publishing. Nature, 495(7442), 426-9. PMID: 23538808   Open access: The true cost of science publishing.

Vasconcelos, S., Sorenson, M., Watanabe, E., Foguel, D., & Palácios, M. (2015) Brazilian Science and Research Integrity: Where are We? What Next?. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 87(2), 1259-1269. DOI: 10.1590/0001-3765201520150165  Brazilian Science and Research Integrity: Where are We? What Next?

KELLNER, A. (2017) Editors of Brazilian journals - a hard life that is getting harder!. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 89(1), 1-2. DOI: 10.1590/0001-37652017891  Editors of Brazilian journals - a hard life that is getting harder!


Building Choice Into Your Students’ Reading

News from EDUTOPIA - Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:25
Create a literacy-rich environment by putting a lot of books in front of your students.

Promising mouse model for Ngly1 deficiency

Research Scholarship - Mon, 04/24/2017 - 04:22
A recent study of Ngly1 deficient mice used a secondary knockout to create double knockouts with symptoms similar to human NGLY1 deficiency....

Fujihira H, Masahara-Negishi Y, Tamura M, Huang C, Harada Y, Wakana S, Takakura D, Kawasaki N, Taniguchi N, Kondoh G.... (2017) Lethality of mice bearing a knockout of the Ngly1-gene is partially rescued by the additional deletion of the Engase gene. PLoS genetics, 13(4). PMID: 28426790   Lethality of mice bearing a knockout of the Ngly1-gene is partially rescued by the additional deletion of the Engase gene.


Intrinsic Motivation Is Caused by Achievement

Research Scholarship - Sat, 04/22/2017 - 23:30
Education interventions (specifically those dealing with mathematics education) designed to increase achievement may be better uses of time than those designed to increase intrinsic motivation....

Garon-Carrier, G., Boivin, M., Guay, F., Kovas, Y., Dionne, G., Lemelin, J., Séguin, J., Vitaro, F., & Tremblay, R. (2016) Intrinsic Motivation and Achievement in Mathematics in Elementary School: A Longitudinal Investigation of Their Association. Child Development, 87(1), 165-175. DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12458  Intrinsic Motivation and Achievement in Mathematics in Elementary School: A Longitudinal Investigation of Their Association


Helping Students Find Their Writer’s Voice

News from EDUTOPIA - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 20:02
Three exercises to get students writing with vivid detail—a key step to developing a distinctive style of their own.

The Student-Centered Math Class

News from EDUTOPIA - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 13:33
Transform your math instruction with three strategies you can start using today.

New Times Call for a New Civics

News from EDUTOPIA - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 01:18
After decades of decline, civics education may be staging a comeback as teachers help their students make sense of a heated political climate.

A Content-Rich Maker Project

News from EDUTOPIA - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 19:18
Students crafting cardboard suits of armor work on literacy, math, and collaboration skills.

What Autism Can Look Like

News from EDUTOPIA - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 15:33
Autism can be confused with misbehavior. Here are three autism behaviors to look out for and tips on how to respond to them.

Using Math Apps to Increase Understanding

News from EDUTOPIA - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 23:24
These 10 free or low-cost apps turn learning math into a game.

Redefining Failure

News from EDUTOPIA - Mon, 04/17/2017 - 13:26
Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction.

Climb Aboard: School Buses Reimagined

News from EDUTOPIA - Fri, 04/14/2017 - 22:46
Mobile greenhouses, art studios, and makerspaces are traveling to underserved kids across the nation—salvaging vulnerable school programs and leveling the playing field to access.

Hooking the Youngest Students on History

News from EDUTOPIA - Fri, 04/14/2017 - 13:25
Use storytelling and playacting to draw early elementary students into the study of history.

Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences

News from EDUTOPIA - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 14:13
Techniques for meeting the needs of students with diverse abilities and interests.

5 Lessons for Greening Your Curriculum

News from EDUTOPIA - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 13:45
Cultivate an indoor farm with inspiration from the Green Bronx Machine.

5-Minute Film Festival: Celebrate Earth Day

News from EDUTOPIA - Tue, 04/11/2017 - 19:22
Jump-start your lesson plans with these videos and resources for students of all ages.

New Supreme Court Decision Benefits Students With IEPs

News from EDUTOPIA - Tue, 04/11/2017 - 16:18
A lawyer breaks down the jargon around the recent Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District ruling and shows how it benefits students.

Risking Limb for Life? (A Guest Post)

Research Scholarship - Tue, 04/11/2017 - 10:22
By Matthew Whitley Imagine you are walking alone in parking lot, when suddenly somebody grabs you by the arm and flashes a knife, demanding your money. Do you A) scream for help, B) try to wrestle the knife away, or C) remove your arm from your shoulder and make a break for it? Disarming your assailant may seem preferable to dis-arming yourself, but for a lizard option C is a likely response. A lizard tail left behind. Image by Metatron at Wikimedia Commons.You likely have heard before that many lizards can break off their tail when trying to make an escape. This ability is called caudal autotomy; autotomy meaning the ability to shed a limb, and caudal simply being a fancy word for tail. Of course, losing a limb is no simple procedure, and lizards possess many specialized features to make caudal autotomy possible. There are two main kinds of caudal autotomy in lizards: intervertebral and intravertebral. Intervertebral refers to when the tail breaks between vertebrae, and is considered the simpler and more primitive form. Intravertebral, on the other hand, involves some more complex features. The word intravertebral refers to fracture planes found in the middle of each vertebra in the middle of the lizard’s tail. At these fracture planes, the bone can easily snap in half. This snapping of bone is performed by the lizard itself—when its tail is caught, muscles surrounding the bone just above where its tail is held squeeze tight until the bone breaks. After the bone breaks, the rest of the tail follows: the skin stretches and breaks, muscles detach, any remaining tissue divides, and—POP—the tail falls off! After snapping your arm off to run from an attacker, you would probably just bleed out in your retreat, but lizards have that covered. In their tails, lizards have sphincters (rings of muscle) along their arteries—vessels that normally carry blood to the tail. When the tail is detached, these sphincters tighten to prevent blood from gushing out. Additionally, their veins, which normally bring blood back from the tail, have valves that prevent blood from flowing backwards, similar to the valves in your heart. And while the lizard makes its escape, the dislocated tail jerks and twitches, which distracts the lizard’s assailant. The tail owes its spastic actions to fast, glycolytic muscles, a variety of muscle that can act quickly and with a lot of force, but wears out quickly. After our reptilian friend has made its daring escape, it has a new problem—it has no tail. A lizard without its tail is at a disadvantage, just as you would be without your arm. Lizards rely on their tails for several functions, including movement, nutrient storage, and social and sexual behaviors. Fortunately, lizards that exercise caudal autotomy can actually re-grow their tails, a process which itself is highly complex. In lieu of a lengthy explanation of another amazing phenomenon, I’ll share this tidbit: to regain lost nutrients and help recover, some lizards have been known to go back and eat their lost tail! So when you tear off your arm to escape a mugger, don’t forget to return to the scene of the crime to self-cannibalize…or maybe just buy some pepper spray beforehand. Here you can see that the lizard is caught by the tail, pops it off and runs away, and the tail is left twitching.Works CitedBateman, P., & Fleming, P. (2009). To cut a long tail short: a review of lizard caudal autotomy studies carried out over the last 20 years Journal of Zoology, 277 (1), 1-14 DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00484.xClause, A., & Capaldi, E. (2006). Caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Comparative Experimental Biology, 305A (12), 965-973 DOI: 10.1002/jez.a.346Gilbert, E., Payne, S., & Vickaryous, M. (2013). The Anatomy and Histology of Caudal Autotomy and Regeneration in Lizards Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 86 (6), 631-644 DOI: 10.1086/673889...

Bateman, P., & Fleming, P. (2009) To cut a long tail short: a review of lizard caudal autotomy studies carried out over the last 20 years. Journal of Zoology, 277(1), 1-14. DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00484.x  To cut a long tail short: a review of lizard caudal autotomy studies carried out over the last 20 years

Clause, A., & Capaldi, E. (2006) Caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Comparative Experimental Biology, 305A(12), 965-973. DOI: 10.1002/jez.a.346  Caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards

Gilbert, E., Payne, S., & Vickaryous, M. (2013) The Anatomy and Histology of Caudal Autotomy and Regeneration in Lizards. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 86(6), 631-644. DOI: 10.1086/673889  The Anatomy and Histology of Caudal Autotomy and Regeneration in Lizards


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